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Archery

PostPosted: 30 May 2017, 20:10
by Trev62
Anyone ever tackled learning archery?

Now we are comfortable with our slingshots we are thinking of progressing to learning some field archery. So is there anyone out there with some tips on beginners bows and equipment etc ?

There are no clubs around us so it will all be self taught (with the help of the internet of course), we are currently reading up on the basics of it all before deciding if we should make the plunge and try it.

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 31 May 2017, 14:03
by fabindia
I know nothing about archery but as they say I know a man who does. He's an England regional judge so knows his stuff.

I'll ask him for you.

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 31 May 2017, 19:52
by Trev62
fabindia wrote:I know nothing about archery but as they say I know a man who does. He's an England regional judge so knows his stuff.

I'll ask him for you.


Thanks that would be appreciated )t'

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 01 Jun 2017, 05:47
by fabindia
Hi Trev,

My mate tells me you should check out this site for the best advice and pointers:

http://www.archeryinterchange.com

Regards

Mike

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 01 Jun 2017, 19:58
by Trev62
Many thanks Mike )like(

Looks a comprehensive forum so will get to doing some research.

Thanks again.

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 03 Jun 2017, 00:53
by manda
My husband and I both Level 1 (but have done all the theory up to Level 3) archery coaches - we use the BEST method which which was developed by a korean coach called Kisik Lee. We were taught by a guy from America called Laval Dee Falks who is just amazing and coaches the USA Olympic Junior Dream Team.

Got into archery because of youngest son who at one point was number 1 in NZ for his age. I've got a couple of recurve bows, son has his recurve bow and hubby has a compound bow...make up our own arrows and hubby makes the strings.

It's a great sport and hubby has used the bow for hunting (although not to the extent as he has guns). I stopped shooting now as I did my neck in and then got more into coaching after that.

http://www.mfaa-archery.org/Tech-Suppor ... ndbook.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
This explains the shot cycle in detail and gives you instructions as to how you should stand, anchor point, back tension etc ...all very important to make sure you don't strain anything (shoulder injuries are common if you don't use the right technique).

If you're looking to buy a bow then you need to make sure you get the right size and draw weight because if you don't that will effect your shooting and if you get something that's to heavy for you that will increase injury too...Lancaster Archery in the US have a helpful page (link below)
http://www.lancasterarchery.com/blog/wh ... ht-for-me/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

You need to decide if you want a recurve or a compound bow. The basic difference being a recurve you hold the weight all the time you are drawing whereas a compound once you've drawn it a lot of the weight is then held by the bow.

You need to make a few decisions before you start and it's not necessarily a cheap sport (in fact I shudder when I think how much we have in the cost of bows and stuff to go with bows and then don't get me started on the cost of arrows (because they can be expensive in themselves)....but all that being said you may be able to find something to get you started second hand but please make sure you look at getting the right one for you not just any old bow. Buy cheap arrows to begin with because it's these that can start to bump up costs...and when you lose them (and you will) those fletchings on the end that you think will make them easy to see ...yeah not so much LOL!! (I cannot think about how many hours we've walked up and down the range at the club looking for kids arrows ...flat piece of grass and can you see them?!! They have the ability to bury themselves flat and disappear completely }hairout{ )

Sorry I'm going to stop now...I kind of love archery )grin2(

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 03 Jun 2017, 10:08
by Mo
manda wrote:........ it's not necessarily a cheap sport (in fact I shudder when I think how much we have in the cost of bows and stuff to go with bows and then don't get me started on the cost of arrows (because they can be expensive in themselves)....


Sounds a bit like music. At least there are cheap 'starter' options (and I don't intend to spend hundreds upgrading from my £10 green plastic recorder, or thousands trading in my £500 piano accordion) but those who are serious about playing need a deep purse.

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 03 Jun 2017, 21:15
by Trev62
manda, thank you for your post and the links it contained.

I am currently improving my understanding of the "mechanics" involved. I have a tentative plan starting with a recurve bow with changeable limbs (along the lines of the Samick Sage) so the draw weight can be adjusted (if need be) by replacing the limbs. We shall see what happens after that.................

We have found a weapons shop with its own shooting range but it is a 3 hour trip from us, they are happy to let us try a variety of bows and show us some basics to get us started if we visit and with no pressure to buy anything (not quite sure I believe that part of our conversation though!).

Appreciate that you pointed out the sport can become expensive, looking through the websites I can only agree so best get things right from the beginning. We are still at the investigating stage at present, my next stop is to visit some of the weapons shops here to see if they can point us to anywhere nearer to us that can help but it would seem most only deal in guns and crossbows.

If arrows are that easy to lose I may consider tying a piece of elastic to their rear end so they automatically return when they miss the intended target!

Thanks again I am sure all the information will be useful

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 05 Jun 2017, 06:36
by manda
Sounds like a good plan Trev...One of the bows I have is a Samick ...excellent bow the other is a Cartel Fantom which is a not too expensive riser you can also change the limbs on (which are also not too expensive).

Re the arrows....You can buy lumi nocks which if you lose the arrows...if you're prepared to stick around till the sun goes down...light up so you see them easier....that is unless they really dig themselves in {rofwl}

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 11 Jun 2017, 20:23
by Trev62
manda wrote:the other is a Cartel Fantom which is a not too expensive riser you can also change the limbs on (which are also not too expensive).


Will have a look at this one as I have yet to come across it in my reading.

manda wrote:Re the arrows....You can buy lumi nocks which if you lose the arrows...if you're prepared to stick around till the sun goes down...light up so you see them easier....that is unless they really dig themselves in {rofwl}


Considering field archery more and more (Samick Sage bow still at the top of the list), have I got this correct though? When using no arrow rest you will need to use arrows with only feather fletchings but these are no good when they get wet, all other arrows will need an arrow rest. So far I have read different things!

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 13 Jun 2017, 04:20
by manda
Trev62 wrote:Considering field archery more and more (Samick Sage bow still at the top of the list), have I got this correct though? When using no arrow rest you will need to use arrows with only feather fletchings but these are no good when they get wet, all other arrows will need an arrow rest. So far I have read different things!


Yep if you use feathers no rest but if you shoot plastic then use a rest. If you want accuracy then rest and plastic fletchings...and you might find you hands take a beating if you don't use a rest (or you'll need gloves).

Re: Archery

PostPosted: 13 Jun 2017, 20:24
by Trev62
manda wrote: ...and you might find you hands take a beating if you don't use a rest (or you'll need gloves).


Thanks, that fact was not mentioned anywhere )t'