LL's Gardening Diary

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Freeranger
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by Freeranger »

Oh dear! It's infuriating when things go wrong, but conditions have been a bit extreme.
I wonder whether a drenching might help poor Scary. Getting her feet and comb wet may help her cool down, and some frozen bits of food maybe? Fingers crossed for her.
I was interested that you kept the lids on your bottles in the vertical planter. I did it myself a while ago with herbs and removed them completely. The results were OK but probably the reverse - the lower ones got a bit too wet, even with drainage - and went a bit algae-ish. There must be a happy medium.
What a shame about the plants. I suppose the warm humidity will help some regrowth on the bedding plants, but your poor vine! What will you do? Just wait and see or will you cut it back?
We had a quite extreme rainstorm last week which was almost overhead, with thunder that rattled the windows and rain like a bucket being emptied fro a great height. Things like ox-eye daisies were a bit flat but not totally squashed due to position between trees, shrubs and fence. I think they'll recover. Our temperatures haven't been as extreme though, but local records still.
I had taken cuttings while house-sitting in late spring, and had uncharacteristically poor results from ones I'd put in jam jars of water. The warmer weather seemed to have encouraged root growth, and I planted a couple out in the garden before coming away for a couple of weeks. The hop plant was growing so quickly I was worried it was going to come for us in the night - I'm sure every time I looked at it there were another couple of inches growth! I put all my plants, jars and cuttings in the bath with a bit of water to maintain humidity, but may pop back to make sure all is well.
We are now house-sitting again and it's warm. Luckily the animals are all coping quite well and finding spots of shade. I have jobs to do in the garden, but apart from roses going over too quickly all seems reasonably OK.
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KarenE
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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Lovely photos of your flowers LL especially the dahlias - mine are just starting to bud. It's a surprise they survived at all, the chickens kept digging them up from the pot they were in, but now their companion petunias are doing so well it's stopped the chooks getting in

I hope Scary is okay. It sounds like she's dehydrated and probably suffering with the heat - it has been quite unbearable. Would you consider bringing her in to keep an eye on her? The cooler temps indoors might help too
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lancashire lass
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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Freeranger wrote:I was interested that you kept the lids on your bottles in the vertical planter. I did it myself a while ago with herbs and removed them completely.


the idea is that the capped end would act like a reservoir while the drainage holes above the cap would allow the water to filter into the bottle underneath. I have noticed the water in the top part is slow to drain through so perhaps the compost underneath is too compacted. I am thinking of poking a hole down the length of the bottles so hopefully water reaches the bottom more quickly and perhaps I will remove the caps after all.

Freeranger wrote:I suppose the warm humidity will help some regrowth on the bedding plants, but your poor vine! What will you do? Just wait and see or will you cut it back?


The growth isn't as lush as before but yes, they are making a good recovery and there are lots of flowers so I think they'll be fine. As for the vine, I'll leave it (give it lots of water) and see what happens.

KarenE wrote:Lovely photos of your flowers LL especially the dahlias


thank you, yes I'm very pleased with all the flowers. I disturbed a visitor to the wildflower bed yesterday morning which I forgot to mention - while walking round giving everything some water, a moth flew off in my face. It was a sizable moth so I wanted to see what it was when it landed and opened its wings before realizing it was a butterfly and instantly recognized those eye spots - it was a Peacock butterfly! Unfortunately it decided not to linger so I didn't have time to go back inside for a camera to take a piccie. I know Peacock butterflies are not rare but to see one in my garden was a lovely surprise.

Despite cooling temperatures, the disadvantage of "insulating" the house is that it takes a lot longer to cool down (funny how this doesn't apply in winter ....) We had overnight rain and some this afternoon but no thunderstorm (perhaps some distant rumbling ... bit hard to distinguish the sound of thunder and airplanes if their flight path is shifted close by as they come in to land or take off from East Midlands airport while the fan is on full belt) or heavy deluge as originally forecast. At least I won't have to rush out and water the plants in the garden, and today I needed to catch up on some rest and zzzzzz's after working a week in a heatwave.

Scary's comb is still flopped over but is bright red, and she seems to be perky and attentive and as vocal as ever, but still food fussy and only ate a few mealworms this morning. This afternoon as I prepared my salad sandwich, I had some ham ... I know, I know - chickens shouldn't eat salty meat bla bla bla (especially if she is dehydrated), but I was a little desperate and I went to the mesh and pushed a bit through where she was sitting. At first she ignored it but then curiosity got the better of her and she pecked at it. Before long she had eaten it all and looking at me for more so I pushed a couple more pieces through. After feeding the fish (with fish food, obviously) I noticed she was pecking away at the mealworms from this morning so perhaps she just needed an appetizer to start her off. Fingers crossed.
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lancashire lass
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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Mo
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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Your bizzy lizzies are doing well.
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KarenE
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by KarenE »

How is Scary doing now LL? Hope her appetite picked up after her carvery buffet :-D
Karen
Alpha chick to: Dorian Grey, Pokey, Smudge and Coco
Chief servant to Marley the cat
Remembering Weeps, Rexie, Sage, Cassie, Toffee, Captain Gabby, Commander Nugget, Ronnie, Juno, Special Poetry and Reading Casper, Tigger, Tophenanall Rembrandt, Chestnut, Tiddly, Willow and Mango
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lancashire lass
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by lancashire lass »

Mo wrote:Your bizzy lizzies are doing well.


Thank you, I'm very pleased with them )t'

KarenE wrote:How is Scary doing now LL? Hope her appetite picked up after her carvery buffet :-D


No, unfortunately her appetite hasn't really picked up. She is eating but not that much including her fave foods. I've checked her over thinking maybe sour crop but it's empty. She has started to moult by the number of feathers starting to build up everywhere - that may be the result of not eating enough. She is an old girl for a hybrid and I've been fortunate to have had her 6 years so we'll have to wait & see.
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lancashire lass
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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As mentioned in my LL's chicken diary post this morning, I'm afraid I have lost Scary - she passed away yesterday {cry} Once more the LL household is without any animals (apart from the fish but not quite the same interaction) and it seems too quiet. I shan't be getting any more chickens for a while so that I can make the chicken run more rat proof and give it a proper make-over - I learned a lot this past 6 years and I know I will once again have chickens one day but for now, I'd like to concentrate on the garden.

I haven't posted for a little partly due to an increased workload at work and various ongoing tasks, plus the weather hasn't always been kind. The August bank holiday is traditionally a time I would make a start on a big project and spend the next 3 weeks trying to get it completed in time before I go back to work after a nice long break. However, the forecast heatwave over the weekend might suit some but not for me. Plus, unlike last year's drought and lack of insects in the garden despite the overgrowth, this year there are plenty about and most seem to be the biting kind. Still, I am getting on with some indoor jobs while enjoying a much needed rest after last week's preparations at work (as I am away for 3 weeks, I usually tie up loose ends and stock up so that the research work won't be interrupted in my absence ... always the potential excuse to stop me enjoying my 3 week break) Anyway, enough of work. First some piccies from last week:

The polytunnel - the potatoes are gradually dying off and will soon be ready for harvesting in the coming weeks. I'm half hopeful for a decent crop but I'm afraid with the plants swamping the onion bed and reduced light conditions when all the fruit trees and hedge/elder finally put on leaf, the onions have not done as well as I would have hoped for. I'll have to give the future onion bed further consideration for next year. Meanwhile, in the other polytunnel are the aubergine and chillies on the left, the tomatoes on the right and further down outside is the "sweetcorn"/wildflower bed and beyond that, the glass greenhouse with more chilli peppers:

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I'm very pleased with the chillies so far - lots of fruit - and the French marigolds are keeping the whitefly at bay. There are scorch marks on the chilli leaves - could be the result of sun scorch or possibly a form of blight/insect damage but whatever the reason, I have since nipped them off as a precaution. The rest of the plant seems fine:

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The aubergine on the other hand are failing to produce fruit }hairout{ Despite my hand pollinating and there are plenty of pollinating insects getting access, not a single one has developed.

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As for the tomatoes, I seem to have no fruit for such a long while and was convinced it was going to be a disaster, but it appear they were camouflaged and now getting bigger.

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Outside the polytunnel, the few sweetcorn are flowering - won't be the biggest harvest, as are the Cosmos. There are still some poppies and other small flowers but now that the Cosmos have grown are not so noticeable. The winter squashes in pots on top of the pallet fence are fruiting. The algae farm ... well, despite the netting on top, there are mosquito larvae in the jars. I have a feeling that's probably my fault - one day I completely emptied the jars then topped up with fresh water and seeded the jars from a bottle in the greenhouse so it's possible there were eggs in the bottled algae water which got into the jars. And to the right you can just make out the apples growing on the tree next to the chicken run:

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Finally (!), courgettes! Never in my gardening life have I struggled to get courgettes - usually I end up with such a glut by now but out of the 5 I planted, only 1 plant is producing fruit and I harvested my first courgette last week. All the plants look green and healthy so I am at a loss as to why other than perhaps the garden is not encouraging enough pollinating insects despite the wildflower bed and all the flowers on the patio. I have to confess that I haven't seen any bumblebees around since the warm spell at Easter and wonder if there has been a crash in numbers as we had a cold spell soon after:

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Meanwhile, the winter squashes planted in the fruit tree bed are taking over the garden - I only had time to take a photo of the ones by the polytunnel, but the others at the bottom of the garden are also growing. Not easy to see here but there are some fruit that have set:

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There is a new addition to the fish pond - a yellow koi. It looks bigger in the photo but is actually the smallest of the fish in the pond at just over 4 inch long (except for the 3 baby goldfish from last year's spawning - they are now about 2 inch in length) Quite an active little fella and quickly settled in the moment he was released and was happily swimming around with the others from the start. The yellow colour really stands out and he is easy to spot.

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As for the others, they have all grown - the silver / black koi is now over 10 inch long (probably nearer a foot if you add the tail) with the black and orange orange a little smaller. I rarely see the black orange koi and although the markings look spectacular, he doesn't come to the surface that often unlike the silver / black except for feeding time and even then, I think he feeds on the food that sinks. Hence one of the reasons for the new yellow one. All the goldfish have grown too - Big Bertha, the Shubunkin, appears almost equal in size to the silver black koi but is more rotundant than length especially when I see Bandit the other Shubunkin is almost the same length but being slender and with darker colours is not so obvious. The little orange tailed Sarasa has also grown a lot and like Big Bertha, is obviously a female and more noticeable than the fan tailed and other Sarasa. Whereas I use to have to search to see the goldfish, they are now easily 7-8 inch in length and swim around in the open a lot more so I get a lot more pleasure from the pond these days. As they get bigger, they swim more slowly. As for the 3 babies - the white and the orange one are well established and part of the fish community and one of the first to appear at feeding time. Since finding them in early spring when I was clearing the blanketweed, I have not once seen the black one and until this morning, I presumed it had died even though I never found a dead fish .... then at feeding time I thought my eyes were deceiving me this morning when I saw something moving in the shade and then it disappeared only to see the black one had indeed survived and almost as big as the other 2. He is mainly black but there are dark red patches too which seem to have developed since I last saw him (goldfish can change colour as they get older - some orange goldfish can even turn black)

As for my September project, weather permitting I will be concentrating on setting up the wildlife pond. I've got some ideas in my head but how it will finally turn out will be down to the materials available. I have been collecting a few items from work which may prove useful. I don't want to give too much detail in case (i) it doesn't work and (ii) I can reveal why I'm being a little cautious at the moment. Meantime, when at the koi shop buying the golden koi, I also bought a few plants for the wildlife pond:

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I had only just bought the plants in this photo so don't look their best but all 3 have recovered the rough handling - the Water Forget Me Not has lots of flowers now. The others are an Orange Peel Plant (Houttuynia Cordata) and a Carex pseudocyperus (the seed heads are past their best) These will be planted on the pond edge and I will also be dividing up some of the plants from the pond planter as well. So lots of things to be doing while I'm on my annual leave )t'
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KarenE
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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So sorry to hear about Scary LL, the garden must be very quiet without her

I think it's been a remarkably bad year for courgettes - certainly where I am, they are not looking good at all. I would've thought you couldn't go wrong with them but it seems you can!
Karen
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Chief servant to Marley the cat
Remembering Weeps, Rexie, Sage, Cassie, Toffee, Captain Gabby, Commander Nugget, Ronnie, Juno, Special Poetry and Reading Casper, Tigger, Tophenanall Rembrandt, Chestnut, Tiddly, Willow and Mango
Also my lost furries Charlie and Jasper
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lancashire lass
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

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Wednesday already and I'm struggling to get any garden jobs done }hairout{ The weather was far too hot over the Bank holiday weekend to do anything more than essential watering and pond maintenance. Yesterday was forecast hot and sunny but just a shade cooler so I ventured out mid morning to do some not so energetic jobs.

First, I finally harvested the shallots which have all died back. Well they did better than expected, each bulb planted produced an average 4-5 bulbs but they are all slightly smaller than the original. Still, they are all usable and will be used in the coming months. Next, garlic ... most of the bulbs lifted were not much bigger than the original clove so very disappointing. I don't think planting them in pots was the problem and most likely the soil used and the mild winter plus not getting full sun once all the trees put on leaf. I haven't harvested the onions but I think I will have the same result - the polytunnel did not get enough light due to shade cast mainly by the elder tree that I left in the hedge (and to be fair, it is more in my neighbour's garden than mine so I could hardly cut it down if I wanted though I can trim my side back) and on the other side, the Bramley apple trees and the other neighbour's bay tree leaving just a narrow bit of light between the 2. And it didn't help when the potatoes grew tall and flopped over onto that side of the polytunnel.

In the polytunnel, some of the tomatoes are ripening earlier than expected especially as the fruit are still tiny. I suspect the reason may be the opposite to the other failures as that half of the polytunnel gets full sun for most of the day, and it has just been too hot! At this moment, the only successful crop are the chilli peppers. I'm leaving the potatoes until they completely die back. I have already harvested some of the salad potatoes (grown from supermarket bought potatoes) - perfect, unblemished but small. I just hope the others fair better - the plants look healthy so fingers crossed.

While I harvested the garlic, I was working under the fruit trees so it was surprisingly cooler than expected. So I got a little ambitious and decided to tackle the privet hedge. The hedge looks so much better after its savage trim and the growth was lush and healthy. It seemed a shame to trim it right back but this should encourage branching which will make it bushier and thicker. I managed to get about a third of the hedge cut but most of it was in the sun and I started to regret the whole idea. All the trimmings were stuffed between the old log fence and the hedge - these were green rather than woody trimmings so they will rot down and add to the soil (as part of my carbon sequestration strategy)

Today I wanted to paint the bottom fence but after seeing the weather forecast of rain all day, I decided to go shopping instead. Quite an expensive shop too by my standards! I needed more tins of white fence paint as I know it'll need at least 2 coats of paint, and of course with the neighbour adding a further 5 feet of wood fencing on top of the new fence panels, that would mean twice as much paint as before! I looked online and the only stock available was in Derby - I might have lived in Nottingham for 29 years but rarely ever go into Derby so it was a nerve racking drive to find where I wanted to go especially as the main route was closed and had to go via the smaller roads. Considering I got to the shop early, the supposed stock available was gone and I ended up getting the more expensive paint instead. Likewise, I wanted to get some solar powered lights and one particular brand had got a good review but they too were all gone so I ended up tentatively buying something I hadn't checked. And finally on my shopping list, some self tapping screws - actually, these were much cheaper than expected. Of course I had to walk by the garden section and they had packets of spring bulbs - now is the time to plant and I really wanted to get some crocus and hyacinths in the ground, and they also had some different daffodils which I thought really pretty. My jaw dropped when the total came up on the till. Still, all "essential" stuff )run( )run( )run(

Despite the forecast of rain, it was sunny all morning. After lunch I decided I'd do a spot of repotting and also make a note of the various dahlias - providing I successfully store the tubers over winter, I wouldn't know what colours they all were so I was going to take photos and label the pot with the relevant information for future reference. But first, the Bocking 14 comfrey (seed are sterile so doesn't spread like wild type) needed urgent repotting. I'm very pleased with the comfrey - considering the 5 pieces of root I bought were tiny, 3 survived and had put on growth but were still all together in a small pot. I wanted to split them into bigger pots and let them grow on before planting out in their final bed (still to be decided) As it happened, 2 plants were big enough to split so there are now 5 plants. Then I made a start on the dahlias - I managed to repot one when the biggest rain drop landed on my lower back and when I looked up, the clouds were dark and menacing. I just had time to move the bag of compost under the awning by the kitchen when the heavens opened, and it hasn't stopped raining since.

I forgot to mention some earlier purchases I made last week. First some seed - in particular, fresh broad bean seed. I intend growing these in the polytunnel over winter and went for the Aquadulce claudia variety. I also wanted some specific flowers for insects - poppy, foxglove, nasturtium, calendula (pot marigold), as well some more Busy Lizzies for next year's planned extended vertical garden. And because I've really taken to growing dahlias from seed, bought 2 types - pompom mixed and cactus mixed (ball shaped like the pompom but the petals are not in tight curls and look ragged) I also got some green manure seed - Crimson Clover. Not only as a green manure but can be grown as a cover plant, and also fixes nitrogen, and of course attracts insects. Finally, there was a special free delivery offer on one of the suppliers I use (normally costs £6) so I ordered the seed potatoes for next year - I'm going to go back to my fave Vivaldi, and I also ordered some asparagus crowns, a variety called Burgindine (they are red in colour and supposedly more tender than other varieties) I miss the asparagus I used to grow on the allotment so made sense to establish a bed in the garden.

Now that I have got an idea of the growing conditions in the garden, hopefully I can plan it better for next year all being well.
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lancashire lass
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Testing the solar lights

Post by lancashire lass »

When I got home from yesterday's shopping trip, I put the solar lights outside to charge up. I doubt any got more than a couple of hours in direct sunlight before the weather changed and it clouded over then rained all afternoon. I moved the lights to the pond to see how they looked in the dark - well, hardly spotlights but they might look brighter when moved down to the bottom of the garden and the back fence is painted white. Despite the short charge up, I have to admit that I am impressed on how well the ones on the right in the photo below have kept a constant illumination level throughout the night. The stem ones - they did get the shortest charge up so hardly a good comparison though when the lights did come on they started off much brighter than the others. Overall I'm quite pleased considering they were cheap.

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Sorry the photo is blurred - I didn't want the flash to come on so despite trying to hold the camera still (wedged against the back door frame) the iris was open for about 10 seconds or more.
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lancashire lass
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Progress of the wildlife pond ...

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... is going painfully slow.

First task yesterday was to paint the "new" bottom fence before making a start on the pond. I was all geared up to get the first coat of paint on but when I walked down to the bottom of the garden, I found myself ducking under the pear and apple tree branches that were heavily laden with fruit (and from all the rain the night before), walking on some already fallen fruit, getting snagged by a rose bush and finally at the pergola, noticed the snowberries had recovered from last year's severe trim and was as big as ever and the old fence panels had to be moved out of the way first. As I was about to step down into the hole I had dug at Easter (for the soil to go into the potato beds in the polytunnel), my foot slipped on the wet and muddy/slimey paving and I ended up doing acrobatics to stop from falling and managed to wrench my neck, shoulder and hip in the process. Feeling a little shaken, I reminded myself to be more careful.

I lifted 3 of the old fence panels from the back and stood them upright inside the pergola. Despite the rotting frame wood on the top and at the sides only where the nails were pinned against the frame, the actual fence wood was still sound. So I've decided to use the wood for some other projects in the garden.

Then I started to paint 2 of the 4 bottom panels, one of which required a bit of contortionism to get behind the willow tree trunk and some balancing act where the soil sloped into the hole. I tried to paint the added fencing on top but there's at least a further 3 feet above which was out of reach not to mention feeling blobs of paint land on my face as I tried to tippy toe higher. I can't see me using a ladder (I only have step ladders anyway and even then only up to the bottom second step) as the soil is soft and uneven so I'll have to give this more thought. I could try spray painting or maybe a mini roller on a pole (which I'm not sure how successful it will be as you really need a brush to stipple the paint on the edges) As I have neither at hand, looks like it will mean another shopping trip to the diy store.

As I painted, I tried to visualize the pond when I realized there was a big problem - at this time of year (or even at summer solstice for that matter) the sun never reached where the pond would be nor would any pond plants in the water or on the edge get any direct sunlight due to the height of the new back fence. It did seem to get lighter by late morning but would it be enough even with the white painted fence for the plants? I'm seriously very annoyed - even if I abandoned the pond idea, it means whatever is planted there will have problems (the recovered snowberry shrubs seemed to tolerate the shade but were tall) I do have about 4 self seeded ferns growing in my garden that seem to tolerate no direct sunlight, and during last year's drought, seem to tolerate very dry conditions too. Where the ferns have come from, I don't know - I remember planting a couple by the pergola but they have long disappeared. It is possible they are responsible for shedding spores. I was planning on moving the ferns down to the pond area when it was finished anyway.

Meanwhile I noticed that where the top fencing met the bottom fencing, there was a narrow shelf along the length of each fence panel. And clearly was a favourite spot for pigeons going off the poo (some of it purple from eating the elderberries) The last thing I wanted was bird poo over the newly white painted fence! I could use the shelf (might have to extend and make it wider) to put potted plants on ... but looking into the future, I would not be able to reach them once the pond was filled. And I also noticed that the pergola frame (and the old fence panels) which I had painted only last year was green with algae. So clearly a nice damp area (as also evident by the huge slugs I found when moving some wood and bricks out of the way) ... I am beginning to wonder if the wildlife pond is such a good idea now as it seems to be posing problems for future maintenance of the area.

After a couple of hours, I went back to the house for a break and then I noticed that I was not feeling so clever so I finished for the day. This morning I was stiff and sore - after I had breakfast, I sorted the fish pond out and then went searching for the secateurs and loppers ... first I cut the rose bush back then slaughtered the snowberry shrubs. I started to paint the last 2 fence panels but only managed to get one done as the other required further shrub decimation (I can't remember the name but my friend called it a yellow pompom flower) which I'm a bit loathe to do at the moment as they are in flower. So once again I finished for the day.

The weather forecast for tomorrow is possibly rain but thereafter for the next week will be dry but on the cool side. As Saturday is my weekly shop day, I think I'll go visit the diy store for some more materials. Meanwhile I got on with my eco bricks (filling 2L pop bottles with non-recyclable plastic mainly various bags and wrapping) as I will need as many as I can make for my garden project (I won't be dropping them off for the overseas projects as highlighted in the link - I feel this just seems like another way of sending our plastic rubbish overseas even though the eco bricks are welcome according to the site) I used not only plastic waste that I had generated at home but also from work as I just didn't produce that much and it takes a lot of plastic to fill a bottle ... I'll admit I was feeling a little apprehensive about bringing rubbish home with me (!) but without which, I could never have achieved my target of 30 eco bricks (that was my minimum as more would be better) It is quite satisfying knowing that every piece of plastic that would normally go as landfill rubbish is being taken out of circulation and having a new use - I can highly recommend it to anyone and is something you can do while watching tv or any other quiet sit down moment and keeps your hands busy.

As the title says, progress has been slow but is also giving me time to think about the problems and possible ideas to get round them.
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by Mo »

I have a yellow (orange tinge) pom-pom shrub. I think it's a sort of Budlia.

Or the name Keria also comes to mind.

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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by lancashire lass »

Mo wrote:Or the name Keria also comes to mind.

Google here I come


You are correct Mo - it is Kerria japonica "Plentiflora I do also have a Buddleia right next to it. My friend gave me the 2 shrubs when I moved into the house and over the past 16 years both had grown into tall trees which I cut right back to about a foot off the ground over winter as part of last year's garden rescue. This year, both have produced lots of sprawling branches. The Buddleia hasn't flowered and the Kerria didn't flower in spring though it seems strange to be flowering now instead of next year.

I think I'll have to trim the area where I want to paint the fence as I have been watching the weather forecast and although for the most part it will be dry, there is rain forecast so the sooner it is done, the better.

Update on the solar lights - I left the lights on the patio where they only got partial sunlight due to shade from the neighbour's ash tree and last night/just before daybreak this morning I checked how they performed and all the lights were bright. Even the dubious stem lights were fine. It could be due to residual charge from the day before but still, I'm impressed.
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Re: LL's Gardening Diary

Post by Mo »

Jim planted both (he could never resist a new shrub, and our garden was planted far too full - it's now a jungle as I don't prune as relentlessly as he did). I found it hard to believe that the 'Orange Ball Tree' was a Buddleia (globosa) - I expected long flowers.
Dance caller. http://mo-dance-caller.blogspot.co.uk/p/what-i-do.html
Sunny Clucker enjoyed Folk music and song in mid-Cheshire
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